Pro Tip: Resistance Series, Pt. 1: Here’s a free tip to unlock you’re explosion

By Jay Ramos

Being the best athlete you can be will always be about picking a credible, comprehensive program and complementing it with the proper nutrition and body maintenance.

With that said, there are ways to gain an advantage on the competition RIGHT NOW and I’m going to show you how.

Let’s talk about doing a very simple exercise to make you more explosive as soon as a few weeks from now. I incorporate this particular motion into several Speed, Agility and Quickness (SAQ) drills with and without resistance.

It’s the stationary high knee’s run.

basketball training in Hollywood, FL

Next Level’s Jay Ramos works with a college basketball player Isiah Thomas on knee drive


– Have a partner wrap a resistance band or a rope around your waist, OR simply prepare to run without it.
– Begin to run full speed in place, while pushing your knees as high as you can.
– Stay on the balls of your feet. Do not lean forward or back. If it is against resistance, it adds a balance element and you should not let the band/rope pull you back or lean too forward against it.
– Do repetitions of 10, 15, or 20 seconds depending on level of condition.

The Science Behind It:

Knee drive is a crucial element to being an explosive athlete in any sport, and this exercise also promotes balance, rhythm and coordination while promoting ankle flexion strength.It does this by addressing one of your hip flexors, specifically the one in the front called the rectus fimoris. It is key in running with explosive speed in a linear fashion, and generating explosion.

Ready to blow by a defender? Ready to leak out in transition and smoking a defense?Get started now.Don’t forget to check out our free speed, agility, and quickness workout at now. Next Level Speed, Agility and Quickness is on the way!

Jay Ramos is a professional basketball trainer and performance enhancement specialist with Next Level Basketball. He is currently constructing a basketball athleticism program called ‘Speed, Agility, and Quickness’ that will be out in early 2015. Check out the preview at

Pro Tips: How a strong lower body helps your ball handling

By Jay Ramos

Ball Handling seems to be everything players want to do. Amateur trainers use gimmicky youtube drills, players want to emulate street ball moves, and everyone wants to cross someone up on instagram.

Well, it’s not just the move itself that makes it happen. It’s how fast you can make it happen. The change of direction is based on setting up your defender first, than exploding into a move to place the force they put into defending you the other way.

We will have plenty of fundamental ball handling material to give you grip and strength as well as technique for your moves, but let’s build your body to perform them explosively.

You need good hamstrings to push past a defender on your moves. You need good gluteal muscles to stay low, and generate the force you need (Plus it hides the ball).

Do this series of squats to get started:

1) Air Squats: Keep your chest up and your feet pointed straight. Go as low as you can and back up in a moderate motion. Don’t rush it. When you’re ready, grab a few dumbbells and hold it to the side as you do the repetition.

2) Timed Squats: Go down for your air squat, hold for three seconds when you are low, and come up.

3) Held Squats: Get low in your defensive stance and hold the position for 30 seconds. Progress to 60 when you can.

Squat Miami Basketball

Challenge yourself to do a squat circuit like this:

1) Air Squats – One set of 15
– 20 second rest
2) Timed Squats – One set of 10
– 20 second rest
3) Held Squat
– 30 seconds

Repeat twice. Increase repetition on first set to 25, second set to 15, and last set to one minute in two weeks.

Do these daily and build stability and strength in your lower body. It’ll help that crossover be that much quicker, and as a bonus prevent injury on the court.

Jay Ramos is a professional basketball trainer with Next Level Basketball. He is currently constructing a basketball athleticism program called ‘Speed, Agility, and Quickness’ that will be out in 2014. Check out the preview at

Tip of the Day (10-22-14) – Benefits of jump roping for basketball players

By Jay Ramos
Jump ropes are a popular tool we have been introduced to as early as elementary school. It’s a cheap, familiar tool we can use anywhere. And that’s great. You know what else? It serves a basketball specific purpose and should be a part of every basketball players took box! Jump roping has obvious cardiovascular benefits and can be used as part of a circuit training workout to condition the body, and it can also be used as a part of a warm up routine. In addition, it works to develop crucial speed, agility and quickess (SAQ) components that translate to the basketball court. Here at Next Level Basketball, we are currently putting the finishing touches on our ‘SPEED, AGILITY AND QUICKNESS’ program, where I put together the same drills and framework my NBA clients do, and you better believe the jump rope is a part of how we warm up, every…single….session. You can too.

Scotty Hopson NBA Basketball Training Miami


NBA Guard Scotty Hopson warming up with the jump rope.


The jump rope develops coordination and rhythm, first of all. It also promotes agility in the sense that it forces an action within a small amount of time. It can even be considered a beginners plyometric as it develops bounce with your feet in a plantar flexed position (Bent downwards). Although there are some intriguing workouts and combinations that can be done on the jump rope, in this post i’ll give you insight on a warm up routine I use for all my high end players before we progress into our workout and after we motion stretch. My athletes will go through a 120 rep jump rope routine (Depending on the athlete, within 45 seconds, one minute, or more), where they begin with 30 single leg hops with one leg at a time, before doing 60 on both legs. The jump rope is an affordable, simple tool that every player can put to use. I like to focus on developing athletes while I develop basketball skills, and the jump rope is one thing I won’t do without that can help you today.

Jay Ramos is a professional basketball trainer with Next Level Basketball. He is currently constructing a basketball athleticism program called ‘Speed, Agility, and Quickness’ that will be out in 2014. Check out the preview at