Balance

Tip of the Day 10/23/14 – Balance matters in basketball

By Jay Ramos

The game of basketball is an artform as much as it is a sport.

The team game can look like an orchestrated performance in ball movement and beautiful offense, and the human body in synch can perform pretty moves in the post or off the dribble that display the delicate footwork of a ballet.

One of the absolute beauties of this game is footwork. At Next Level Basketball and in our upcoming ‘Speed, Agility, and Quickness’ program, I will give you insight into how I prepare my NBA players’ bodies for the game nearly as much as I teach and repeat the skills.

A key and often ignored ingredient than can unlock some sudden body control is balance training. You do so much off of one leg in basketball, you would think it be emphasized some more.

Know what else is cool? It serves as a light core stabilizer and helps prevent injury by providing dynamic joint stabilization.

Balance Training Miami Basketball

Pro Trainer Jay Ramos with an athlete working on balance and posture.

It helps stabilize your core because it forces your body to recruit muscles to align in the way they were meant to, without inbalances and hunches.

It supports joint stabilization, for instance, the hip adductors and gluteus medius are forced to stabilize the hip, which is crucial to have strong in the game of basketball.

In more simple words, your body will be more prepared for impact and your body control will advance itself! Think of the way Derrick Rose or Dwyane Wade keep their body under control in a tough finish in the lane and imagine that they probably have very good balance at more than a stable level.

My balance circuits vary depending on the level, but you can do a few exercises on your own after your warm up and it only takes a few minutes. I will always say you need to look for every slight advantage you can get, and this is one of them.

Want to start balance training? Try this: Begin by standing straight on one leg. DO NOT lean forward or backward, and keep your core in line. Try to stand without moving for 20 seconds. Once you can do that, begin moving the leg that is up behind you, as pictured above, while keeping your body straight, slightly bending your knee and not leaning forward. Hold for a second and repeat.

We will have more on balance going forward, and to see my introduction to basketball balance training as a preview into our ‘Speed, Agility and Quickness’ program in the making, visit NLBTraining.com for our free workout.

Jay Ramos is a professional basketball trainer with Next Level Basketball. He is currently constructing a basketball athleticism program called ‘Speed, Agility, and Quickness’ that will be out in 2014. Check out the preview at NLBTraining.com.