Pro Tip: Resistance Series, Pt. 2: How this pro player got his speed back

By Jay Ramos

You know that player on the court who people just don’t want to defend? That player with the quick feet and deadly hesitations that can shift you out of position on defense and put you on a highlight reel?

Former University of Tennessee guard Bobby Maze was that player. During his time as a two year starter in college, UT went to the sweet-16 his senior season, and he has gone on to enjoy a successful pro career overseas.

But when he enlisted me to do his offseason program last summer, we realized one thing very quickly: He was way out of shape. When we started working out we also realized one thing very quickly: B-Maze still had it.

Next Level Basketball Bobby Maze Jay Ramos

Coach Jay describes a harness drill to Bobby Maze (University of Tennessee).

The explosive crossover was back and he even toasted one of my NBA clients one of my stamina crushing full court 1-on-1’s.

How did he round into shape?

Resistance Training.

See that band on his waist in the picture? Bobby had to run 50 foot sprints against varying resistance, and in the process, his hamstrings began to get their strength back and his quadriceps starting to drive like they were meant to drive.

The Science Behind It:

I discussed stationary high knee running here as a way to develop the front hip flexor and create knee drive, and after this introductory exercise, we can begin to develop those hamstrings into powerful machines to help you really start generating the most force you can on the wood, and in turn, just blowing by people and letting them feel the breeze. You should have a 2:1 ratio of strength to support the knees from the quads-hamstrings, so remember that some sound strengthening like the ones we have outlined before should complement these explosive workouts.


– Acquire a still harness to wrap around the waste.
– Grab a partner
– Run four 50 foot sprints with your partner placing between 50-75 percent resistance on you as you move.

Remember, the point isn’t to put complete force against you to the point where you can’t move, it is to put optimum force against you to the point where you’re running mechanics are the same and you are exploding but resistance is forcing maximum output.

For visual, check out Bobby and NBA forward Michael Beasley doing some of this work here:


Jay Ramos is a professional basketball trainer and performance enhancement specialist with Next Level Basketball. He is currently constructing a basketball athleticism program called ‘Speed, Agility, and Quickness’ that will be out in early 2015. Check out the preview at